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Tell Me About The Book You're Reading

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This is a "What Are You Reading?" thread with an extra dynamic: What makes the book you're reading interesting to you?

 

I just finished James M. Cain's Double Indemnity, and was interested by the complete absence of dialogue tags (he said, she said after spoken lines). It mostly worked and failed occasionally.

I also liked the structure, which allowed this sort of order/chaos format to rest on the story's major crime, which took place in the near-exact middle of the book.

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I am reading the John Jakes Bicentennial series (on book two) from the 70s.

 

it's not stylish, the story and characters are very basic.  But they're my Mom's books.  And when I read them, a lot of times I'm reading them and sort of wondering how she read them and what she thought as she read them, how she felt about certain characters and passages and things like that. 

 

 

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i just finished The Winners Kiss (last of a trilogy) by marie rutkoski. simply amazing. every paragraph was truly just...artful. shes incredible.

 

reading anne rices new book now

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i just finished The Winners Kiss (last of a trilogy) by marie rutkoski. simply amazing. every paragraph was truly just...artful. shes incredible.

 

reading anne rices new book now

 

What's she write?

 

And I didn't know Anne Rice had a new book out, but good to know she seems to have no plans on stopping. :)

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Atlus Shrugged so i can look down on you poor pathetic souls. just kidding, i don't read books

To be honest, I often feel like not reading is better than reading Ayn Rand.

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To be honest, I often feel like not reading is better than reading Ayn Rand.

is she really that terrible of an author honestly. or is it that it's a 1200 page jerk off to capitalism?

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is she really that terrible of an author honestly. or is it that it's a 1200 page jerk off to capitalism?

 

The dialogue was what killed it for me.

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The Whole Death Catalog  by Harold Schechter. I love his books about historical serial killers (I found the quote in my sig in his book about Albert Fish), and death has always been interesting to me - after all, it' is the great equalizer.

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The Whole Death Catalog  by Harold Schechter. I love his books about historical serial killers (I found the quote in my sig in his book about Albert Fish), and death has always been interesting to me - after all, it' is the great equalizer.

What a great title, too!

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I recently finished Yasunari Kawabata's Snow Country and am now reading through his collection of short stories under The Dancing Girl of Izu.

 

I'm also reading (slowly, of course) Karl Ove Knausgaard's My Struggle: Book 2 and Juan Rulfo's Pedro Paramo. Also J.A. Baker's The Peregrine.

 

Also a number of Cormac McCarthy books. I usually start reading books then splinter off and read another then juggle.

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Spooks of the Valley, by Louis C Jones, and The Phantom Tollbooth, by Norton Juster. Spooks is a collection of ghost stories from the Hudson Valley, with a modern day story wrapped around them, and The Phantom Tollbooth is about a bored child named Milo and his adventures in the Lands Beyond. Yeah, they're both kids' books - I read them the first time when I was about 9 - but when I'm feeling overwhelmed, books that I read in simpler times are very soothing.

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I recently finished Yasunari Kawabata's Snow Country and am now reading through his collection of short stories under The Dancing Girl of Izu.

 

I'm also reading (slowly, of course) Karl Ove Knausgaard's My Struggle: Book 2 and Juan Rulfo's Pedro Paramo. Also J.A. Baker's The Peregrine.

 

Also a number of Cormac McCarthy books. I usually start reading books then splinter off and read another then juggle.

 

I love Snow Country so much, and Kawabata's palm-of-the-hand stories (known more commonly now as flash fiction).

If you get a chance, read Kawabata's final piece, in which he condenses Snow Country into a mere few pages.

It's interesting to be able to compare the strengths and weaknesses of both forms.

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Spooks of the Valley, by Louis C Jones, and The Phantom Tollbooth, by Norton Juster. Spooks is a collection of ghost stories from the Hudson Valley, with a modern day story wrapped around them, and The Phantom Tollbooth is about a bored child named Milo and his adventures in the Lands Beyond. Yeah, they're both kids' books - I read them the first time when I was about 9 - but when I'm feeling overwhelmed, books that I read in simpler times are very soothing.

 

I reread The Phantom Tollbooth and immediately gifted my copy to my niece(s). I'm hoping they really get into it.

<3

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I reread The Phantom Tollbooth and immediately gifted my copy to my niece(s). I'm hoping they really get into it.

<3

 

Thanks for reminding me - my granddaughter just turned 7, and I have to make sure that my daughter still has her copy. It may be a couple of years, but it's best to be prepared. :D

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I'm not reading it yet but I'm tempted to buy and read a book I saw in a list of gay novels recently called "The Beauty's brother"

 

it's apparently a gay fairy tale loosely based on the Beauty and the Beast

 

 

it also interests me because it is VERY similar to the earliest draft of a Gay fairy tale I had been writing that I ultimately scrapped because I could not come up with a good ending

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I'm not reading it yet but I'm tempted to buy and read a book I saw in a list of gay novels recently called "The Beauty's brother"

 

it's apparently a gay fairy tale loosely based on the Beauty and the Beast

 

 

it also interests me because it is VERY similar to the earliest draft of a Gay fairy tale I had been writing that I ultimately scrapped because I could not come up with a good ending

 

You scrapped it because of only the ending? :(

 

Endings are tough but they come along eventually, and if that's the only thing holding you back, that's a minimal number of problems. Writing and making stuff up is difficult. Give it its time.

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You scrapped it because of only the ending? :(

 

Endings are tough but they come along eventually, and if that's the only thing holding you back, that's a minimal number of problems. Writing and making stuff up is difficult. Give it its time.

the story was  bit too similar to Princess Tutu as well, I shelved it to make it more original, then ultimately just thought it was not good because I was trying too hard to write a Gay Disney Prince story...which is basically a contradiction in and of itself

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the story was  bit too similar to Princess Tutu as well, I shelved it to make it more original, then ultimately just thought it was not good because I was trying too hard to write a Gay Disney Prince story...which is basically a contradiction in and of itself

 

Lots of great work is inhabited by contradiction. That's how some work finds its tension.

Feels like you're trying too hard? Try harder. Make it obvious. Finish it before you fix it. :o

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basically what I like about Gormenghast is just the general freakish vibe mixed with kind of a gray quality.  The characters are also very sort of like larger than life masquerade/festival type characters almost.  The writing is interesting.  Like how he chooses to relay information and through which characters.

 

Just started it, and right away - the very first dialogue is between Rottcodd and Mister Flay, neither of whom seem much skilled in communication, nor do they seem particularly interested in communicating.  yet there they are.  The purpose of the exchange story-wise, is to announce the birth of the Earl's heir, but it also sets up a number of other things.  And I love that Flay has no idea why he decided to visit Rottcodd.  And just from beginning to end, the exchange is full of the tiny little neuroses of both characters.  it's fantastically obtuse and uncomfortable.

 

And then as the book progresses, business picks up in terms of intrigue and manipulation, as Steerpike begins to spread his wings and fly.

 

But it's been a long time (like probably over a decade) since I've read it.  So long enough that I don't remember some of it.  Certainly not the smaller details.  Though I do remember how and when a lot of the characters die, which doesn't matter so much with this, because the situations are so interesting and odd and sometimes funny, even with the deaths, that it's still entertaining even when I remember what's coming.

 

I like it because it's sort of grand and overstated like an opera.  But also humorously fixated, cantankerous and self-deprecating.  It's oddly light and heavy at the same time.  It's funny, but also very well considered and presented, and can be moving.  It's got a moral center to it, even though a lot of the characters are morally bankrupt, or missing parts of their emotional selves.

 

I've only read it like twice I think.  A long time ago.  I'd forgotten how much I enjoyed it.

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Lots of great work is inhabited by contradiction. That's how some work finds its tension.

Feels like you're trying too hard? Try harder. Make it obvious. Finish it before you fix it. :o

I decided to start writing it again because of your feedback

 

still kinda just doing it for myself though, I still think we're about 50 years away from ever getting a Gay disney movie...if not longer than that

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I'm redoing my banned books list at the library (last week of September, people!) and I'm finding so much stuff - just finished Tobacco Road and God's Little Acre0 (both by Erskine Caldwell). Right now, I've got Claude Brown's Manchild in the Promised Land in the living room, Huckleberry Finn (annual re-read) in the kitchen, and Sir Richard Francis Burton's translation of the Arabian Nights in the bedroom (tbh, no way am I getting through it - it's good, but it's also 6 volumes.)

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On 1/4/2017 at 1:25 PM, Bouvre said:

This is a "What Are You Reading?" thread with an extra dynamic: What makes the book you're reading interesting to you?

 

I just finished James M. Cain's Double Indemnity, and was interested by the complete absence of dialogue tags (he said, she said after spoken lines). It mostly worked and failed occasionally.

I also liked the structure, which allowed this sort of order/chaos format to rest on the story's major crime, which took place in the near-exact middle of the book.

The Gender War

another dystopian young adult novel

its not too bad, i guess

its a 7 book series though. i have 3 more books in the series to read after this one.

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These days I have to focused on required reading, but doesn't mean the books are bad.

Currently starting off Nisei Daughter by Monica Sone. A little easier read than other novels, this one is a true story of Japanese American little girl growing up with her immigrant family in Seattle after WW1 and it's eventually going into Japanese Internment. We are only a third of the way through, it's really cute to hear her describe the delicious food her family makes, and the other traditions she was forced to attend or do. There were already stories of bigotry with the police trying to take advantage of her father.

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On 1/20/2018 at 9:40 AM, mthor said:

The Art of War and The Book of Five Rings. I require clarity.

The Art of War is a great book.

 

Right now I'm reading Oathbringer by Brandon Sanderson and Silent Warrior by Charles Henderson.  The former is the third Stormlight Archive book and the latter is an account of the career of a Marine sniper named Carlos Hathcock.  He was with a scout/sniper unit in the Vietnam war.  Oathbringer is great, if you like Sanderson.  Or fantasy books in general.

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So I finished Nisei Daughter, it accounted her families story in the internment camps. But she had a surprisingly positive outlook at the end of the story. It was really tame and her religious belief helped her get through the experiences. 

Now I'm 12 chapters in Lakota Woman. A far more intense book of a young Sioux Woman living through the American Indian Movement in the 1970s and has participated in the biggest protests during that time. Far more historically intriguing for me because I'm learning about a bunch of Native American civil rights movements I hadn't been educated on before. Lots of crime, drinking, fights with police and racist locals, and also interesting stories of peyote trips and old native traditions, a new favorite for me.

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@Bouvre

Listening to Zane in the car.

Reading the Gender Game books. On book 6 out of 7

Reading teen fiction book "Antisocial", too. Teen fiction is my favorite genre!

 

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On 4/29/2018 at 3:01 PM, ghostrek said:

the hunt for red october

Tell me about it

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On 4/27/2018 at 10:17 PM, fuggnificent said:

@Bouvre

Listening to Zane in the car.

Reading the Gender Game books. On book 6 out of 7

Reading teen fiction book "Antisocial", too. Teen fiction is my favorite genre!

 

Is teen fic different from YA? I know of children books, middle grade, and YA

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On 4/21/2018 at 12:49 AM, jackiemarie90 said:

So I finished Nisei Daughter, it accounted her families story in the internment camps. But she had a surprisingly positive outlook at the end of the story. It was really tame and her religious belief helped her get through the experiences. 

Now I'm 12 chapters in Lakota Woman. A far more intense book of a young Sioux Woman living through the American Indian Movement in the 1970s and has participated in the biggest protests during that time. Far more historically intriguing for me because I'm learning about a bunch of Native American civil rights movements I hadn't been educated on before. Lots of crime, drinking, fights with police and racist locals, and also interesting stories of peyote trips and old native traditions, a new favorite for me.

This sounds rad!

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On 3/21/2018 at 11:24 AM, mthor said:

Reading Rex Stout again. I've been thinking about my dad a lot lately - he died 8 years ago right around this time of year, and I remember the first summer I came back home, he and I would spend evenings on the porch reading the adventures of Nero Wolfe. Seems like the right thing to be reading right now.

Thank you

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10 hours ago, Bouvre said:

Tell me about it

realy it been out sinice 1984

 

it  about  a sovite submarine captain defecting to the usa and taking his missle submarine with him and us cia anlayist  try contact him befor it is to late it is classic

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Currently reading "Where'd You Go, Bernadette?" which is delightful and fun and comedically well-observed. I'm partial to the ensemble of voices throughout and the mostly epistolary form, which so far allows for very fun reveals. I'm so far reading it far quickly than I imagined I would.

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1 hour ago, Bouvre said:

Currently reading "Where'd You Go, Bernadette?" which is delightful and fun and comedically well-observed. I'm partial to the ensemble of voices throughout and the mostly epistolary form, which so far allows for very fun reveals. I'm so far reading it far quickly than I imagined I would.

sounds like a fun book

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On 5/13/2018 at 6:23 PM, ghostrek said:

sounds like a fun book

It's pure reading pleasure. Likely to become a favorite of mine.

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21 hours ago, Bouvre said:

It's pure reading pleasure. Likely to become a favorite of mine.

Yeah, I truly enjoyed this book. Adventurous, funny, and vibrantly orchestrated. Likely going to be one of my best books read this year

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19 hours ago, Mix said:

Dorian Grey....again >.>

What brings you back to it?

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29 minutes ago, Bouvre said:

What brings you back to it?

nostalgia 

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Well, I'm reading a book called The Exile about OBL.  It's interesting, I've read books by his family members and US Military, but this has info from a number of sources I've never heard from.  Lot's of Religious supporters, financial supporters, etc.

I'm also reading a book called King Rat by James Clavell.  Excellent book.  He wrote a  whole series of books about Asia.  one other famous one was Samurai.  I can't recommend his books enough.

I'm also reading a book call The Seascape Tattoo, it's written by two authors, so I have little hope, but I needed something sci fi or fantasy to read at the time.

And finally, I'm reading Fart Proudly, by Benjamin Franklin.  Yes, that Ben Franklin.  It's fucking awesome.  The man was not only a genius, he was a visionary.

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Vagabonding: An uncommon guide to the art of long-term world travel 

By Rolf Potts

Only 40 pages in, it discusses things like like learning to be ok with quitting a job for a short while to travel, to not consume material possessions to save money, and early planning. I've been wanting to travel more for awhile now, Italy was beautiful, but I'm interested in solo back packing travelling. Its not realistic for people with children, but I am finding myself with a few months free after the fall semester, and I'm thinking of investing in the amazing experience. 

Also anyone else just look up book pdfs online to read for free? >_> It's habit I've picked up from students using pdf textbooks for classes and it's easier for me to read random books online. Plus I have one of those folding tablet laptops now. xD

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I finished Vagabonding by Rolf Potts. It's a short read about 190 pages but found myself distracted towards the end. I had to force myself to finish it so I could move on to other projects. After explaining basics like saving money, health and safety, the later half of the book focuses on the experiences and connections made while travelling. There are chapters on your expectations and being more open, spirituality, volunteer work etc. It's an easy read, one of the best part of the books if you are interested in certain travel chapters he has a list of books for that chapter at the end of each one. As well as a little history on some famous travel writers throughout time.

For now, I'm going to focus on a Math guide book to help me prepare for Pre Calculus in the fall. It's the College Panda SAT math as it is a well reviewed one. xD More just practice problems but there is some reading into getting techniques done.

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It takes place in Maine and Dude's daughter's cat just got ran over and they buried it in an old Native American graveyard

 

...I'm reading Pet Sematary

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I was rereading The Stand because I was bored.

I am just like Larry Underwood except I'm not a one hit wonder.

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On 8/9/2018 at 9:52 PM, molarbear said:

It takes place in Maine and Dude's daughter's cat just got ran over and they buried it in an old Native American graveyard

 

...I'm reading Pet Sematary

I haven't read nearly enough King but I imagine this being one I use to get into his work.

That and Misery

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