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naraku360

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naraku360 last won the day on November 11 2020

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About naraku360

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    Birdemic

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  1. Written by Nisio Isin? Pretentious? Badly written? Sign me up.
  2. Scheduled vaccine for 5/11. I think it's Pfizer. Don't really care which I get. I think there were only 3 or 4 slots in my area, didn’t see any other ones outside my work hours.
  3. Bruh, they can't stop having PTSD flashbacks of "Happy holidays" from last year's war on Christmas. Imagine these dweebs in an actual fight.
  4. "Judeo-Christian values" is (was?) common with the alt-right, so mostly younger crowds. It's interchangable with "Christian values" since they never distinguish between the Judeo and the Christian, and it's just talking about how flawless Christianity is. Even Ben Shapiro, who claims to be an orthodox Jew, throws this one around (relevant since he's one of the biggest conservative hacks) but basically just touts Christianity when he does. Of course, Judeo-Christian is an absurd phrase, and western culture is equally so, and Anglo-Saxon wasn't actually a racial group of white people. Nazis aren't exactly known to being in agreement with reality.
  5. I typically hear it phrased as "western culture" or "Judeo-Christian values" as a placeholder for "Anglo-Saxon" used to dogwhistle "not white=bad" when it comes to white supremacists. Anglo-Saxon seems more of an academic term. I might have heard a couple white supremacists explicitly say it that way, but the other 2 seem to be far more common.
  6. I don't think I've ever heard "Anglo-Saxon" in reference to the Confederacy or US-based slaveowners. It's always been Germanic colonialists taking over early-medieval Britain. That said, the education I've had that used the phrase was generally critical and upfront about the history on it. Honestly always thought it was a way of distinguishing between Germanic colonialists and natives to Britain in the early implementation of Christianity, but none of that inherently indicates a positive or negative stance on it. I've used the phrase and I'm not exactly a fan of colonialism or Christianity.
  7. Yeah, that first one references the data I was thinking of, so it's definitely newer. The study may have said that otiginally but my dumb baby brain isn't smart enough to understand fancy science words.
  8. I've been seeing reports that post-vac is considered safe to do things without a mask. Probably wouldn't yet out of courtesy, but it's at least not dangerous to my knowledge.
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