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UnevenEdge

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If states with nobody in them want to have greater pull, maybe they should convince people to move to Bumblefuck, Nowhere and grant them that greater pull.  Good luck.

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1 hour ago, naraku360 said:

Boy, that was a kneeslapper.

It wa..?

Oh, you were being sarcastic.

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7 hours ago, Top Gun said:

If states with nobody in them want to have greater pull, maybe they should convince people to move to Bumblefuck, Nowhere and grant them that greater pull.  Good luck.

So, to change the U.S. Constitution and remove the Electoral College, you will need a two thirds majority in both the House and Senate, a ratification among the fifty governors and the president's signature.

Can you get all that?

No, there aren't enough people who agree to that.

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6 minutes ago, Top Gun said:

Add civics to the list of classes Packard dropped out of.

You have to change the Constitution to get rid of EC.

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The president has absolutely no role in ratifying a constitutional amendment, nor do state governors, and only a 3/4 majority of either state legislatures or state conventions is necessary for ratification.

You're fucking illiterate.

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10 minutes ago, Top Gun said:

The president has absolutely no role in ratifying a constitutional amendment, nor do state governors, and only a 3/4 majority of either state legislatures or state conventions is necessary for ratification.

You're fucking illiterate.

What does a ratification among the fifty governors mean to you?

Hint:  I didn't say that all fifty governors have to concur.

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The governors have literally no say in the process, you ignorant fuck. 

Edited by Top Gun
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25 minutes ago, Top Gun said:

The governors have literally no say in the process, you ignorant fuck. 

Well, at least you're right about the president.  Turns out the one Nixon signed was ceremonial.  As for the states...

A proposed amendment becomes part of the Constitution as soon as it is ratified by three-fourths of the States (38 of 50 States). 

https://www.archives.gov/federal-register/constitution

 

 

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17 hours ago, 1pooh4u said:

Funny, with the exception of the Jackson Adams election (where all candidates were of the democratic Republican Party wtf that is lol) each time the EC favored the republican and the popular vote was won by democrats. 
 

no wonder the GOP wants to keep an unneeded system in place. 

The Democratic-Republican party was the original name of the Democratic party. Eventually the name shortened up, and even more eventually a new party emerged and took the name Republican party.

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32 minutes ago, Doom Metal Alchemist said:

The Democratic-Republican party was the original name of the Democratic party. Eventually the name shortened up, and even more eventually a new party emerged and took the name Republican party.

Is that back when Democrats were like republicans and there was a Federalist Party that was similar to democrats?  I’m also curious how every candidate was from the same party. How were they holding elections back then?

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27 minutes ago, 1pooh4u said:

Is that back when Democrats were like republicans and there was a Federalist Party that was similar to democrats?  I’m also curious how every candidate was from the same party. How were they holding elections back then?

I don't know the answers to those questions without doing research, which I don't want to do.

All I know is, Thomas Jefferson was our first Democratic-Republican president. The Republican party didn't rise up to prominence until the Democrat's then main nemesis, The Whig party, withered and died. Whether the Republican party existed but didn't flourish much or it didn't exist at all until The Whigs were gone I don't know without looking up, and I don't care enough to. :P

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Bucket faded into the shadows and Packard showed up to take his spot in the clown car, huh?

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1 hour ago, Doom Metal Alchemist said:

I don't know the answers to those questions without doing research, which I don't want to do.

All I know is, Thomas Jefferson was our first Democratic-Republican president. The Republican party didn't rise up to prominence until the Democrat's then main nemesis, The Whig party, withered and died. Whether the Republican party existed but didn't flourish much or it didn't exist at all until The Whigs were gone I don't know without looking up, and I don't care enough to. :P

I don’t care to either. That’s why I asked cuz you seemed to know so much 

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6 hours ago, 1938 Packard said:

Well, at least you're right about the president.  Turns out the one Nixon signed was ceremonial.  As for the states...

A proposed amendment becomes part of the Constitution as soon as it is ratified by three-fourths of the States (38 of 50 States). 

https://www.archives.gov/federal-register/constitution

 

 

Tell me where that mentions governors playing any sort of deciding role, shit-mopper. 

Edited by Top Gun
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23 hours ago, Raptorpat said:

The Republicans effectively replaced the Whigs.

Did they not exist until the Whigs died, or did they exist but just wallow in the shadows, and then became prominent once the Whigs died?

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15 minutes ago, Doom Metal Alchemist said:

Did they not exist until the Whigs died, or did they exist but just wallow in the shadows, and then became prominent once the Whigs died?

from wikipedia:

The Republican Party was founded in the Northern states in 1854 by forces opposed to the expansion of slavery, ex-Whigs, and ex-Free Soilers. ... The name was partly chosen to pay homage to Thomas Jefferson's Republican Party. The first official party convention was held on July 6, 1854 in Jackson, Michigan. In September 1855, William Seward led his faction of Whigs into the Republican Party, effectively marking the end of the Whig Party as an independent and significant political force. Thus, the 1856 presidential election became a three-sided contest between Democrats, Know-Nothings, and Republicans.

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The Whigs were quite factionalized, notably on the issue of slavery, because their original cohesion was built around opposing Andrew Jackson rather than a consistent slate of policies.

In modern politics, the two major political parties on occasion undergo recalibrations of their respective coalitions, but the formal parties themselves remain intact.

In this case, the Whigs collapsed due to the factionalism and the Republican party more or less arose out of one of those factions, taking prominence with the Lincoln (who was previously a Whig Congressman) election in 1860.

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1 hour ago, wacky1980 said:

from wikipedia:

The Republican Party was founded in the Northern states in 1854 by forces opposed to the expansion of slavery, ex-Whigs, and ex-Free Soilers. ... The name was partly chosen to pay homage to Thomas Jefferson's Republican Party. The first official party convention was held on July 6, 1854 in Jackson, Michigan. In September 1855, William Seward led his faction of Whigs into the Republican Party, effectively marking the end of the Whig Party as an independent and significant political force. Thus, the 1856 presidential election became a three-sided contest between Democrats, Know-Nothings, and Republicans.

Heh, sounds kinda like The Republicans killed The Whigs themselves.

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The Republicans didn't kill the Whigs so much as the Whig organization/coalition imploded and the new Republican party happened to be in the best position to pick up the pieces.

But like it says, the Republicans were basically a major faction of the Whigs and more former Whigs joined the new party. This is worth pointing out to people who want one of the major parties to die off today - if, for example, the Dems collapsed and the Greens filled their vacuum, most of the Dem politicos would likely just join the expanding Green organization.

So it wouldn't be an absolute clean slate as people tend to imagine, just a new hierarchy and priorities but most of the same people under a different banner.

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For Packard. Note: No mention of governors.

 Both houses propose an amendment with a two-thirds vote, and three-fourths of the states approve the amendment via ratifying conventions. ... (4) Two-thirds of the state legislatures call on Congress to hold a constitutional convention, and three-fourths of the states approve the amendment via ratifying conventions.

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6 minutes ago, Raptorpat said:

The Republicans didn't kill the Whigs so much as the Whig organization/coalition imploded and the new Republican party happened to be in the best position to pick up the pieces.

But like it says, the Republicans were basically a major faction of the Whigs and more former Whigs joined the new party. This is worth pointing out to people who want one of the major parties to die off today - if, for example, the Dems collapsed and the Greens filled their vacuum, most of the Dem politicos would likely just join the expanding Green organization.

So it wouldn't be an absolute clean slate as people tend to imagine, just a new hierarchy and priorities but most of the same people under a different banner.

Yep.

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Fun fact: out of the possible combinations of procedures for amending the Constitution, the national convention to propose an amendment has never been used.  All but one of the amendments were proposed via two-thirds Congressional vote and ratified by three-fourths of state legislatures.  The only exception was the 21st Amendment (bless), which was proposed by Congressional vote and then ratified via state conventions.

Edited by Top Gun
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You need governors to get on board if you want to do a constitutional convention though right?

Maybe that's what he's thinking of. 

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3 hours ago, SwimModSponges said:

You need governors to get on board if you want to do a constitutional convention though right?

Maybe that's what he's thinking of. 

Presumably, though I think it's largely left up to the individual states to handle the implementation of such a convention.  I don't know the details of how it was done for the 21st Amendment.

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